Kaupapa Indicator Bank

The kaupapa indicator bank consolidates a number of indicators that can be used to measure the scale, efficiency and ultimate outcomes of tribal programmes.

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The kaupapa indicator bank contains:

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These indicators endeavour to link, like the poutama depicted in the tribal programmes toolkit section, each discrete activity with contributions to the actual kaupapa that are driving the work programmes. The indicators for enabling impact, hapū and whānau benefit and tribal impact should apply across all of the projects, activities and initiatives in the area of work.

The indicators are separated into six key categories:

  • Te Aō Tūroa – which endeavours to connect the environmental work of Iwi and Māori organisations to the living relationship between Iwi Māori and our ancestral landscapes
  • Iwitanga – which endeavours to recognise the importance of the work that goes into cultural identity and language revitalisation to whānau, hapū and Iwi identity
  • Te Ira Tangata – which endeavours to connect the benefits for individuals from education, quality of health, financial wellbeing and leadership development to the benefits for whānau, hapū and Iwi
  • Marae/Hapū Development – which endeavours to connect the work that goes into development in economic, social or cultural terms to the strengthening of ahi kaa and the vitality of marae/hapū communities
  • Influence/Advocacy – which endeavours to connect the work that goes into rights protection, advocacy and influence to tangible benefits for whanau, hapū and iwi
  • Iwi and Māori Organisations – which brings together some important components of Iwi and Māori organisations being, and being seen to be, on the kaupapa (the content is drawn from the Organisational Toolkit section)

Please note, the indicators do not have timeframes specified in the indicator banks for the principal reason that the period will depend on how organisations implement and integrate the performance management framework. It will therefore be necessary to assign a timeframe that is suitable for your organisations’ approach.

The data sources for each indicator are also identified and are of three key types:

  • Internal Accounting Data – which is mainly needed for measuring scale and efficiency and largely consists of consolidating direct project costs, the costs of staff salaries and overheads associated with project delivery.
  • Iwi Profile – which is compiled by Statistics New Zealand for every Iwi (over 1000 members), and is sent to each Iwi after each census. It contains information on:
    • population,
    • language,
    • education,
    • religion,
    • households and families,
    • labour force,
    • unpaid activities,
    • income,
    • housing,
    • motor vehicles and telecommunications,
    • number of children born, and
    • smoking behaviour.
  • Surveys – most of the data for hapū, whānau and tribal benefit will need to be collected by surveying tribal members, so there are possible survey questions set out that could help. While surveys take precious time and resources, it will not be possible to demonstrate impact without talking with people. It might be worth exploring whether a summer intern or a few high school students could contribute, or whether a local university might be able to incorporate surveying and analysis into one of its course. There are support tools for conducting surveys in the Tribal Programmes – Surveys to Measure Kaupapa Contributions section.

Te Aō Tūroa Indicators

The Te Aō Tūroa indicators endeavour to connect the environmental work of Iwi and Māori organisations to the living relationship between Iwi Māori and our ancestral landscapes. They are based on the following assumptions:

  • That environmental protection, whether directly through restoration projects or indirectly through various advocacy strategies, is an important outcome in its own right; and
  • That the ultimate purpose or kaupapa driving environmental protection work is to strengthen, rebuild, and enhance the way Iwi Māori interact with their rohe/takiwā in a real and tangible sense to perpetuate identity.

The tiers of indicators therefore endeavour to reflect:

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The indicators are set out into two sub-categories:

  • Mahinga Kai – which endeavour to encompass the typical spread of Iwi and Māori organisations work concerning the marine environment and other mahinga kai sites
  • Whenua – which endeavour to encompass the typical spread of Iwi and Māori organisations work concerning the land and natural resources.

Download the Te Aō Tūroa Indicators »

Iwitanga Indicators

The Iwitanga indicators endeavour to recognise the importance of the work that goes into cultural identity and language revitalisation to whānau, hapū and Iwi identity. They are based on the following assumptions:

  • That the numbers of people with knowledge and fluency in te reo rangatiratanga is an important outcome in its own right; and
  • That the ultimate kaupapa language and culture regeneration is that it contributes to the vibrancy of the community, its’ cultural creativity and the pride of people in their hapū and tribal identity

The tiers of indicators therefore endeavour to reflect:

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The indicators are set out in four categories:

  • Mātauranga Indicators – that endeavour to connect the work dedicated to cultural revitalisation to outcomes that benefit whānau and hapū, and the perpetuation of tribal identity into the future.
  • Whakapapa Indicators – that endeavour to connect the whakapapa infrastructure that many Iwi organisations use for recording tribal membership to outcomes that benefit whānau and hapū, and the perpetuation of tribal identity into the future.
  • Te Reo Indicators – that endeavour to connect the work dedicated to language revitalisation to outcomes that benefit whānau and hapū, and the perpetuation of tribal identity into the future.
  • Tribal Connectedness Indicators – that endeavour to connect the various efforts that go into fostering whānau members to actively connect/re-connect with the Iwi to outcomes that benefit whānau and hapū, and the perpetuation of tribal identity into the future.

Download the Iwitanga Indicators »

Ira Tangata Indicators

The Ira Tangata indicators endeavour to connect the benefits for individuals from education, quality of health, financial wellbeing and leadership development to the benefits for whānau, hapū and Iwi. The indicators are based on the following assumptions:

  • That the numbers of individuals with educational achievements, good health, financial wellbeing and leadership skills are an important outcome in their own right; and
  • That the ultimate kaupapa of Iwi and Māori organisations helping individuals to reach these achievements is both about contributing to quality of life of tribal members and about strengthening whānau, hapū and Iwi through doing so.

The tiers of indicators therefore endeavour to reflect:

View a larger version of this diagram »

The indicators are set out in four categories:

  • Education Indicators – that endeavour to connect the work dedicated to promoting access to, and achievement within education and contributes to the strength, development and pride in the Iwi
  • Health Indicators – that endeavour to connect the initiatives to support equal outcomes of tribal members within the health system to the benefits created for whānau and Iwi through better quality of life and longer life expectancy
  • Financial Wellbeing Indicators – that endeavour to connect the contributions to increasing the savings and financial resources of tribal members to benefits for whānau and Iwi
  • Leadership Indicators – that endeavour to connect the leadership and succession planning work, to the contributions that emerging and established leaders can make to the strength, vitality and development of whānau, hapū and Iwi.

Download the Te Ira Tangata Indicators »

Marae/Hapū Development Indicators

The marae/hapū development indicators endeavour to connect the work that goes into development in economic, social or cultural terms to the strengthening of ahi kaa and the vitality of marae/hapū communities. The indicators are based on the following assumptions:

  • That development is an important end in itself; and
  • That the ultimate kaupapa of marae and hapū development is to contribute to the strengthening of ahi kaa around marae.
  • These indicators are also complemented by the whānau and hapū impact indicators in all the other categories.

The tiers of indicators therefore endeavour to reflect:

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Download the Marae/Hapu Development Indicators »

Influence Indicators

The influence indicators endeavour to connect the work that goes into rights protection, advocacy and influence to tangible benefits for whanau, hapū and iwi. The indicators are based on the following assumptions:

  • That influencing the national and local policies and politics is an important part of rights protection; and
  • That rights protection is driven by the ultimate objective of being able to express and perpetuate identity and ways of living.
  • These indicators are also complemented by the whānau and hapū impact indicators in all the other categories.

The tiers of indicators therefore endeavour to reflect:

View a larger version of this diagram »

Download the Influence Indicators »

Iwi And Māori Organisation Indicators

The Iwi and Māori organisation indicators bring together some important components of Iwi and Māori organisations being, and being seen to be, on the kaupapa. They are drawn from the content contained in the section.

Download the Iwi and Maori Organisation Indicators »

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